ECO Scheme Storage Heater Grants and Boiler Grants

Free Cavity Wall Insulation for Home Owners and Tenants

Subject to the Type of Home you live in, your Heating System and a Free Home Survey. You DO NOT need to receive State Benefits.

If your home has no cavity wall insulation, apply for an ECO Grant today and you could save over £275* every year on your heating bills

* According to the Energy Saving Trust

Complete the Cavity Wall Insulation Grant Application Form today, to see if you qualify

Free Cavity Wall Insulation Grants from the Affordable Warmth Scheme
Free Cavity Wall Insulation

Cavity Wall Insulation Grant Application Form

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  • 1. Your Details:

  • We need this to confirm that you qualify for a cavity wall insulation grant

Free Cavity Wall Insulation - Do You Qualify? - Rules for Home Owners and Private Tenants

There are TWO WAYS in which you may qualify for Free Cavity Wall Insulation:

1. With the AFFORDABLE WARMTH SCHEME (AWS)

To qualify for Free Cavity Wall Insulation with the Affordable Warmth Scheme, you must:

1. Be a homeowner or a tenant with a private landlord
2. Receive certain State Benefits or Tax Credits (listed below)
3. Live in a property with cavity walls but no cavity wall insulation

2. With the CARBON EMISSIONS REDUCTION OBLIGATION (CERO)

To qualify for Free Cavity Wall Insulation with CERO you:

1. Must be a homeowner or a tenant with a private landlord
2. Must live in a property with cavity walls but no cavity wall insulation
3. DO NOT NEED TO receive State Benefits or Tax Credits

AWS - Your State Benefits

To qualify for free cavity wall insulation (from the Affordable Warmth Scheme) you need to receive one of these State Benefits or Tax Credits:

  • Guaranteed Pension Credit (Pension Credit Savings Credit and Ordinary State Pension do not qualify)
  • Child Tax Credit*
  • Working Tax Credit*
  • Income Support
  • Universal Credit*
  • Income-Related Employment & Support Allowance (ESA) or
  • Income-Based Job Seeker’s Allowance (JSA)

Benefits marked with * are subject to maximum household income thresholds based on the number of adults and children living in your home.

Contribution-Related Employment & Support Allowance and Contribution-Based Job Seeker’s Allowance do not count.

These income thresholds are set out in the table below:

CERO - Your Home

To qualify for Free Cavity Wall Insulation (from the Carbon Emissions Reduction Obligation) you DO NOT NEED TO RECEIVE STATE BENEFITS but you must satisfy the following conditions:

  1. You either own your home or you rent it from a private landlord. (Different rules apply to tenants in council houses and properties owned by housing associations).
  2. Your home has cavity walls but no cavity wall insulation installed.
  3. Your home satisfies detailed qualifying criteria in respect of the type or property, number of bedrooms and number of external walls. Please see below.

Cavity wall insulation became part of Building Regulations for new homes on 1st January 1983 so if your home was built prior to that date it may not have had cavity wall insulation installed originally, although it may have been installed later.

Cavity wall insulation is installed by pumping insulation material into the cavity through drill holes in the external wall of your home. These drill holes should have been filled in but marks will be left where they are.

Before 1924 most properties were built with solid walls which had no cavity between the external wall and the internal wall.

Affordable Warmth Scheme Qualifying Criteria - income thresholds for Tax Credits and Universal Credit
Detailed Qualifying Criteria for Free Cavity Wall Insulation - Home owners and private tenants
There are two ways in which householders can qualify for Free Cavity Wall Insulation Grants:
  • Affordable Warmth Scheme (officially known as the Home Heating Carbon Reduction Obligation or HHCRO)
  • Carbon Emissions Reduction Obligation (CERO)

Both options require that you live in your own home or one which you rent from a private landlord. Different rules apply if you rent your home from your local council or a housing association.

Free Cavity Wall Insulation from the Affordable Warmth Scheme

The rules relating to free cavity wall insulation from the Affordable Warmth Scheme are in three parts:

  1. You must receive one of the qualifying State Benefits or Tax Credits listed above.
  2. Your home must satisfy certain criteria with regard to its type, how many bedrooms it has, how many external walls it has and what type of heating is installed.
  3. Your home must be constructed with cavity walls but have no cavity wall insulation installed.

If you qualify for Free Cavity Wall Insulation with Affordable Warmth Scheme funding, you WILL NOT be required to make a contribution to the cost of installation.

If you do not qualify for Free Cavity Wall Insulation with Affordable Warmth Scheme funding, you may qualify under CERO but some householders will have to make a contribution to the cost of installation.

Free Cavity Wall Insulation from CERO

The rules relating to free cavity wall insulation from CERO are also in three parts:

  1. You DO NOT need to receive one of the qualifying State Benefits or Tax Credits listed above.
  2. Your home must satisfy certain criteria with regard to its type, how many bedrooms it has, how many external walls it has and what type of heating is installed.
  3. Your home must be constructed with cavity walls but have no cavity wall insulation installed.

There are two possible results under CERO: you will either qualify for free cavity wall insulation OR you will qualify for a grant towards the cost of installing cavity wall insulation but you will need to make a contribution.

Which of these results applies to you will depend on the type of property you live in, how many bedrooms it has, how many external walls there are and what type of heating is installed.

You will be more likely to qualify for free cavity wall insulation under CERO if you live in a larger property with several external walls and / or you DO NOT have gas central heating.

Householders in small properties with fewer bedrooms, fewer external walls and gas central heating will be less likely to qualify for free cavity wall insulation and will have the highest contributions to make.

Apply for YOUR Cavity Wall Insulation Grant Today.

Free Cavity Wall Insulation For Council Tenants and Housing Association Tenants

Free Cavity Wall Insulation is also available for Council House Tenants and Housing Association Tenants but different rules apply.

You do not need to receive State Benefits or Tax Credits but your home must have an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) Rating of F, G or H.

You can check your own EPC (if one has been prepared) HERE for England and Wales.

The Scottish EPC Register can be found HERE.

It should show whether your home was constructed with cavity walls or solid walls and should also state whether cavity wall insulation has already been installed or not.

How much does Cavity Wall Insulation Cost?

The cost of installing Cavity Wall Insulation depends on the type of property, how large it is and what type of insulating material the installer uses.

The following table shows the typical cost of installing Cavity Wall Insulation for each property type. It also shows how much you can expect to save on your heating bills if you have gas central heating.

Free Cavity Wall Insulation Grants - Cavity Wall Insulation Costs

Installing Cavity Wall Insulation in homes with oil or LPG boilers, Electric Storage Heaters or solid fuel heating systems should result in higher annual savings.

How do I check whether my home has Cavity Walls?

Cavity Wall Brickwork Construction

Solid Wall Brickwork Construction

Free Cavity Wall Insulation - Cross Section of a Cavity Wall

With a cavity wall the bricks are laid ‘end to end’ so that they all the same from outside.

The internal and external walls are held together with stainless steel brick ties.

Free cavity wall Insulation - Cross Section of a Solid Wall

With a solid wall there is no, or little cavity between the external brickwork and the internal wall.

They are held together by bricks which are laid across the two walls and you can see the ends of these bricks from outside.

Installing cavity wall insulation to an existing property

If your home was originally built without cavity wall insulation it is possible that it has been installed since.

You will be able to tell by checking the external brickwork and looking for the mortar-filled holes where the insulation was pumped in.

To install cavity wall insulation, small holes have to be drilled into the wall to enable the insulation to be pumped into the cavity and these should be visible.

Free Cavity Wall Insulation - Drill marks filled with mortar after cavity wall insulation was retro-fitted to a house
Drill marks filled with mortar after cavity wall insulation was retro-fitted to a house
Cavity Wall Insulation

Heat will always be lost from a warm area to a cold area, and in a house without cavity wall insulation around a third of the heat created inside can be lost through the external walls.

The vast majority of houses constructed after 1924 have external walls consisting of two layers of brick or block work with a gap, or cavity between them. However, it was not until the 1970’s that cavity wall insulation became widespread and not until the early 1980’s that improved insulation qualities demanded by Building Regulations effectively made it compulsory.

Installing free cavity wall insulation will help reduce your heating bills

The material used in cavity wall insulation fills the gap between the outer and inner skin of the external walls and this helps to reduce heat loss and save energy. By installing cavity wall insulation in a house without any, householders can save over £275 per year in energy bills. (According to the Energy Saving Trust).

Are cavity walls better than solid walls?

A home built with cavity walls will generally be better insulated and suffer less from condensation than one built with solid walls.

Properties constructed with solid walls will still normally have two layers of brick or block but will have little or no cavity between the two skins of brickwork.

Most homes in the United Kingdom have exterior walls with a cavity between two skins of brick work or block work and cavity wall insulation fills that gap, which helps to keep in the warmth, saving energy and reducing your energy bills.

Free cavity wall insulation can also help to reduce condensation inside your home if this is a problem on your external walls. In general terms, the need for cavity wall insulation will probably apply to your home if:

• The property was built after 1924 but before 1983

• The external walls have a cavity more than 40 mm wide and it is not currently filled

• The brick work or block work is in good condition

• The walls are not exposed to driving rain

A registered installer can carry out a boroscope inspection to determine whether your home already has cavity wall insulation. This involves drilling a small hole in the external wall and using a camera to check if the cavity is empty or filled.

Installation of your Free Cavity Wall Insulation

Heat will always be lost from a warm area to a cold area, and in a house without cavity wall insulation around a third of the heat created inside can be lost through the external walls.

The vast majority of houses constructed after 1924 have external walls consisting of two layers of brick or block work with a gap, or cavity between them. However, it was not until the 1970’s that cavity wall insulation became widespread and not until the early 1980’s that improved insulation qualities demanded by Building Regulations effectively made it compulsory.

Installing free cavity wall insulation will help reduce your heating bills

The material used in cavity wall insulation fills the gap between the outer and inner skin of the external walls and this helps to reduce heat loss and save energy. By installing cavity wall insulation in a house without any, householders could save over £275 per year in energy bills.

Is installing cavity wall insulation a DIY job?

Installing your free cavity wall insulation is NOT a ‘do it yourself’ job. The installer should be a member of NIA (National Insulation Association) or CIGA (Cavity Insulation Guarantee Agency) and the installation of your free cavity wall insulation should be guaranteed for 25 years by CIGA.

In order to insulate the cavity, holes about 22 mm in diameter are drilled through the outer skin of brickwork at 1 metre intervals so that the insulation material can be blown in.

The holes should be filled after the cavity has been insulated. The insulating material used is normally mineral wool or foam insulation in the form of beads or granules.

But if you have any damp patches on the internal walls, cavity wall insulation should not be installed until the damp problem has been properly resolved.

Based on a three bedroom, semi-detached house, your free cavity wall insulation could save around £275 per year on your heating bills.